HOMELAND SECURITY

 TITLE 6 > CHAPTER 1 > § 101

 § 101. Definitions

 In this chapter, the following definitions apply:

(1) Each of the terms “American homeland” and “homeland” means the United States.

(14) The term “State” means any State of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and any possession of the United States.

(16)

(A) The term “United States”, when used in a geographic sense, means any State of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, any possession of the United States, and any waters within the jurisdiction of the United States.

(B) Nothing in this paragraph or any other provision of this chapter shall be construed to modify the definition of “United States” for the purposes of the Immigration and Nationality Act [8 U.S.C. 1101 et seq.] or any other immigration or nationality law.

 “It is unnecessary to lay special stress on the title to the soil in which the channels were dug, but it may be noticed that it was not in the United States.   The language of the acts is “public works of the United States.”  As the works are things upon which labor is expended, the most natural meaning of “of the United States” is “belonging to the United States.””  Ellis v. United States, 206 U.S. 246; 27 S.Ct. 600 (1907)

 The phrase “State of the United States” does not include any of the 50 Union States because the term “of” connotes possession and the Union States being one of the creators of the United States can not then become a possession of the United States or included in federal territory subject to federal jurisdiction as set out in Article I, Section 8, Clause 17 and/or Article IV, Section 2, Clause 3 of the federal Constitution. This is verified above in Ellis v. United States.  (“Of” connotes possession so that “States of the United States” are possessions and therefore federal Territory.)

Once federal jurisdiction is well understood, we quickly learn that from (1) above that the force and effect of “Homeland Security” legislation is absolutely limited to the United States because “Homeland” means the United States which, as a matter of law, is only in federal territory and that is as it is Constitutionally meant to be.

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